Author Topic: Queens  (Read 3366 times)

vadentwin

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Re: Queens
« Reply #15 on: May 06, 2019, 03:31:21 PM »
This is a great forum. Thanks for the info


Rojodiablo

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Re: Queens
« Reply #16 on: June 22, 2019, 11:51:14 PM »
Hello Dirt Rooster!! I need some help; I have 2 small hives which I have been nursing along, and just when they started to come right.... the queens have thrown in the towel. One died/ disappeared, and her hive has some capped brood but very few open larvae cells. The other queen was a decent laying bug, but she ran out of gas and is now wandering aimlessly and barely laying.
I need two queens, and I am in Southern California. I need 2 queens, would take a 3rd as an insurance policy if the shipping might be stressful.

Please let me know, or if anyone else has some they can ship ASAP I sure would appreciate it!! Thanks, Paul. Email; Paulromanowskirec@gmail.com

enginetrics

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Re: Queens
« Reply #17 on: June 23, 2019, 04:04:30 AM »
Hi Rojodiablo - welcome to the forum.

I have a few questions for you...

Are you in a dearth this time of year in Southern California?
Do you have any more hives and if so, what are they looking like?
Are these nucs?



Dirt Rooster

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Re: Queens
« Reply #18 on: June 23, 2019, 09:49:19 PM »
I agree with looking at resources.  If you are in a dearth the queen will cut back.  Try feeding and see if she turns it back on.  Make sure she has somewhere to lay.

Rojodiablo

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Re: Queens
« Reply #19 on: June 25, 2019, 01:43:35 AM »
Hi Rojodiablo - welcome to the forum.

I have a few questions for you...

Are you in a dearth this time of year in Southern California?
Do you have any more hives and if so, what are they looking like?
Are these nucs?
My bees are ok. I am in a very healthy tree/ plant rich residential area. Lots of fruit trees, eucalyptus, and many different flowers which prodce good pollen and nectar pretty much year round.
Just came off a honey flow about a month ago as the last of the fruit trees flowered but there are lots of flowering trees for forage. Bees come home thick (nectar filled) and three colors of pollen. Yellow, red and orange.
I have 4 hives; they are all splits from my primary hive. There are two large hives; the primary and the first swarm which was March. A second and third swarm came off the same hive in April. The last one struggled, I got it going ok, bu the queen is gone as of last week. Maybe 2 lb of bees, say 8-10,000. 6 frames fairly full. The #3 hive is also smallish, but better; like 7/8 frames built. Queen is still there, but kinda quit laying.
The two large hives are 30/40,000 strong, mean and have very big queens who are aggressive and lay lots of brood. #1Primary hive is 2 boxes 95% built out, has excluder. #2 hive has 3 boxes, 2 are supers, 100% built out. Has excluder.

I got three queens coming from Oliveras bees in Northern California. One is just insurance. $35 each; pricey, but shipping pronto, so it's ok to save the hives. (Attached to the weak hive; they have fought the good fight so much, I am pulling for them!!) If all 3 queens are good to go from shipping, I will take a frame from each of the two big hives and make a 5 frame nuc and drop it in a friend's yard for a 5th hive.
I do expect good continued feed for 4 months, around late October it will slow down a but here, but not bad. (No real frost until January.)

enginetrics

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Re: Queens
« Reply #20 on: June 25, 2019, 06:09:27 AM »
Good thing getting queens shipped in from NorCal instead of across the US. They will endure a lot less shipping stress and your success rate will reflect that.
Sounds like you have a good plan going forward. I would still consider feeding them though. If there is still plenty of nectar in your area, they may reject the feeding. If they use up the syrup, that may indicate that there is not as much local nectar as you think. Have a look at this chart provided by NASA. It indicates that Star Thistle and Alfalfa are the primary nectar producers remaining (Is there much of that in your area?). You still have a lot of pollen producers though.

https://honeybeenet.gsfc.nasa.gov/Honeybees/ForageRegion.php?StReg=CA_3

I'm just pointing this out just in case your smaller hives are having trouble competing with your bigger established hives.
Really strange about the weaker hive queens. The remaining queen may have backed off laying due to lesser resources.
There's no telling about the hive that is missing their queen. She may have been rejected and balled or just absconded with a handful of bees as a micro swarm. Or, she's still in there but so small she blends in with the workers. I guess this is a good reason to mark queens and clip wings.....of which I rarely ever do.

Do you know these guys? http://www.beekeepersassociationofsoutherncalifornia.org/meeting-location
I'm thinking you might be able to compare notes with them regarding what you experienced with your queens. Could be a regional thing or just plain bad luck...

You didn't mention if the new queens were mated. If they are, it wouldn't hurt to install them and feed them. This should simulate a heavy nectar flow and get them laying almost immediately.

Please keep us posted on your progress and success. This is a great learning opportunity for our readers.

BlazingBees

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Re: Queens
« Reply #21 on: June 25, 2019, 12:02:48 PM »
No frost till January!?! Wow we get frost in late September somtimes and snow in October

Rojodiablo

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Re: Queens
« Reply #22 on: June 25, 2019, 11:46:54 PM »
Enginetrics; I ttried to put out some syrup water for them, they hardly touched it at all. I do coat a section of empty frames with honey every week or two in the small hives; it doesn't last but two days. No alfalfa close by; we have more sage and scrub oak in the edges of riverbeds, creeks, parks. But we have lots and lots of various desert flowers and many weird tropical flowers from all manner of yards and gardens. I'm in a decently wooded and vegetation strong city (Santa Ana California.)
Will feed tomorrow early before work some extra honey, and when the new queens get installed I will load a frame or two for them; I like your point. They might be struggling against the two big hives. That makes sense.......

Rojodiablo

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Re: Queens
« Reply #23 on: July 01, 2019, 11:51:38 PM »
Re-queening went well. Set up feeders, (post on these to come!) and looking good.
So, for west coast folks, Oliveras bees sent me good queens and we are off to the races.

linuxman51

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Re: Queens
« Reply #24 on: July 02, 2019, 07:34:39 AM »
I got a saskatraz package from oliveras this year, and wow! they hit the ground sprinting, not just running! I bet if they'd had the same start time as my other packages they'd have 3-4 packed supers on top, population exploded just in time to miss most of the spring flow (they were the last package I got, and I wanna say they got installed at the beginning of may-forage fine, but the numbers didn't fully pop until about 3 weeks ago, so they didn't have a full complement of foragers)