Author Topic: Feeding  (Read 351 times)

huyard

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Feeding
« on: August 21, 2020, 11:27:21 AM »
I live in Southern Arizona and am new to beekeeping we caught our first swarm in May and don't really now about the pollen flow here was just wanting to now if this time of year should I bee feeding my bee's. Should I use pollen patties or dry pollen sub. with sugar water. I would like to build them up also to do a split next spring any advice I can get would be helpful.

doggoner

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Re: Feeding
« Reply #1 on: August 21, 2020, 11:58:05 AM »
The best advice I can give you is to contact your LOCAL extention office and pose your questions to them. They can direct you to a LOCAL beekeeping group. I keep saying LOCAL because beekeeping is a local deal. I live in south Mississippi and the climate is quite different here than where you live. Try  https://azhoneybeefest.org/arizona-beekeeping-organizations/ or www.azbeekeepers.org/ or http://southernazbeekeepers.org/. These should be a great source of info for you. Good luck with your bees. They are fascinating creatures for sure.

doggoner
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vadentwin

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Re: Feeding
« Reply #2 on: August 21, 2020, 12:05:10 PM »
I avoid feeding except when needed, but, if this is a swarm going in a new box, that would qualify for needing to feed. I am in Florida and my hives have pollen coming in close to year round. I have read/watched where pollen patties can really help them grow but I haven't used them.

I would start with feeding 1:1 and watch the foragers coming and going to see if there is pollen coming in. If you don't see much pollen on returning bees and don't see bread in the frames you may want to start a pollen patty or other supplement. I would also discourage entrance feeders as they can lead to robbing. I have a few entrance feeders that I use but I pull the top cover, put the feeder on the inner cover and then an empty box and lid over that. I also use frame feeders with ladders but even with the ladders more bees drown. I haven't invested in the more fancy feeders because I don't use them often.

vadentwin

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Re: Feeding
« Reply #3 on: August 21, 2020, 12:09:43 PM »
I posted overlapping Doggoner. He makes a good point and local beekeepers and clubs are the best resources. You will figure out how you want to do it and always take advice (including mine) with a grain of salt. My favorite bee keeping quote is "Ask 5 bee keepers a question and you will get 6 answers"

huyard

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Re: Feeding
« Reply #4 on: August 22, 2020, 01:54:26 AM »
Thanks for all your help.

Miklg

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Re: Feeding
« Reply #5 on: August 25, 2020, 10:26:55 AM »
Sometimes local information can be off a bit also. I have been dry and in a dearth since april but others in my bee club in the same county made lots of honey. I have a notebook of species blooming last year vs this year. Noticed lack of some species in may. 15 miles difference can affect what is available and different in your home area. Keep notes and build your reference guide for your area.

Rojodiablo

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Re: Feeding
« Reply #6 on: August 28, 2020, 08:04:59 PM »
Take a walk around where your bees are kept, and see what's blooming, from small to large. I have near my house several hedges that have tiny flowers on them..... loaded with bees. I have some bigger flowers around that don't have a single bee on them, ever, as best I can tell.
My southern bee yard did real well until this mad heat showed up mid August; it's probably similar to your area (Alpine, Ca) They are in a dearth, and I have to go feed them quite a bit nowadays. They are pulling almost no pollen, so I have to keep them fed until the heat breaks and some new growth will go off, and there will be some trees that will flower for fall. The numbers will drop, not much new brood will be formed. But if you see little to no pollen coming in, and it's a small hive still, I would feed a protein patty to them to keep them laying and growing for the next month or two and then the fall and wintering plants will start up for them.
Your bees city/ urban bees, or desert bees, or mountain bees?